All posts by The Edge News

Zine & Indie Comic Symposium is back for its fourth and biggest year!

Image Credit: James Hornsby, Cult Carousal. On display at The Edge for the Zine and Indie Comic Symposium 

 

This coming Friday, 19th of August, the Zine and Indie Comic Symposium (ZICS) will return to The Edge for a three day celebration of independently published zines and comics.


The three-day long festival (now in it’s fourth year!) will kick off with a Pub Scrawl on the Friday evening at Green Beacon Brewing, Tenerife and will continue on with panel discussions, table fair and workshops at The Edge until 5pm on Sunday afternoon.

Matt LynchJust to back track a little, and give you all an idea who we are and what ZICS is all about, firstly let me introduce myself. My name’s Matt Lynch (on the left there) and it’s actually my first year doing work in this collective and it’s been nothing short of a grouse experience. ZICS is a collective comprised of local Brisbane zine and independent comic creators aiming to create a yearly community focused event celebrating everything that encapsulates self-published work.

The Symposium will run from 12pm – 5pm on both Saturday and Sunday and will feature a 50 table fair in The Edge’s Auditorium, panels hosted by ZICS members, and special outside guests such as Alisha Jade and Nat Karmichael. Workshops will be presented by the WendyBird on zine basics and, and the Golden Stapler awards will be announced on Saturday afternoon.

Once the event finishes up on the Saturday, we’ve organised a FREE AFTERPARTY GIG at New Globe Theatre in Fortitude Valley with The Flangipanis, Gravel Sandwidge, and 2 Chevron all bringing the party.

 

So, if you’re looking for something to do this weekend, come down to The Edge and check out Brisbane’s best gathering of artistic communities and get some hands-on experience in creating your own DIY product and get involved with the Symposium.

 

 


MDA Student Hub launches at The Edge

MDA Student hub logo for gallery-01

The MDA Brisbane Student Hub, a free support service for international students, will open its doors at The Edge this week!


Brisbane is home to over 75,000 international students from over 160 different countries and the Brisbane Student Hub is the first of its kind here in Queensland.

Students can drop in between 12pm-5pm on Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays to study, use the laptops and Wi-Fi or relax with friends.

Students can also access information and advice for anything related to living in Queensland – including asking any questions they have about employment, volunteering and accommodation.

WELCOMING NEW QUEENSLANDERS

We asked Mo Zaidan, an international student from Amman, Jordan, about the new Brisbane Student Hub and making the most of the unique space at The Edge.

Mo (above, left) is studying his Masters in Marketing at Central Queensland University’s Brisbane campus and is in his second year in the Queensland capital.

What excites you most about the new Brisbane Student Hub?

From my experience, I know international students move to a new country with a lot of questions. The Brisbane Student Hub will be the first point of contact for anything international students want to know about.

It’s also a great opportunity to meet new people and make new connections here in Queensland.

 

What features of The Edge will you be using?

I’m looking forward to doing any courses related to digital media, graphic design, digital marketing or social media.

The Edge offers so much for students, like the free Wi-Fi and the café as well.

The space on the Mezzanine is a great spot to study, finish off group assignments or just hang out with friends in between classes.

I think it will really help maintain our work-life balance when it comes to studying.

 

Why is it important for Queensland to have a free support service like this for international students?

The first year for all international students is always the hardest so this support will help students settle into their new life in Queensland.

I think the events and workshops will be really beneficial too because it gives us a chance to be a part of the community – to socialise and to network.

 

The Brisbane Student Hub will open from Wednesday 17 August 2016, and is a partnership between MDA Ltd, The Edge, Study Queensland and Study Brisbane. For more information, view the Brisbane Student Hub page.

 

MDA Logo strip


Call for entries – Digital Portraiture Award

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The National Portrait Gallery has opened the Call for Entries for the annual Digital Portraiture Award, where an artist will win $10,000 cash and an artistic residency valued at $10,000 with The Edge.


Now in its fifth year, the Award seeks to extend the traditional notion of portraiture to the digital realm and encourages creative thinking.

‘In a world dominated by Google, Facebook and Twitter – where the adage ‘you are what you eat’ has become ‘you are what you tweet’ – data is a conduit of identity,’ said Gill Raymond, Online Manager at the Portrait Gallery.

‘The Portrait Gallery has always been interested in exploring the possibilities of portraiture and, while digital art as a medium has been around for decades, the genre of portraiture in this space is still evolving.

‘The Digital Portraiture Award is a unique opportunity for digital artists to help us define what portraiture looks like in the digital age.’

In 2016 the Award is moving in an exciting new direction. The Portrait Gallery is now offering one award category open to all entrants over the age of 18 consisting of $10,000 cash and an artistic residency valued at $10,000 with The Edge, at the State Library of Queensland, one of Australia’s leading centres for the development of contemporary art across digital technologies.

The Digital Portraiture Award highlights the Gallery’s commitment to screen-based narratives and digital technology. The highest quality works addressing identity and portraiture will be selected for exhibition and displayed in National Portrait Gallery from 2 December 2016.

The work of the Award finalists will also be available on the Portrait Gallery website extending the outreach potential of digital art to regional Australia and reinforcing the Gallery’s commitment to young and emerging artists.

The Digital Portraiture Award 2016 will be displayed at the National Portrait Gallery from 2 December 2016 to 9 April 2017.

Call for Entries closes 30 September 2016. More information on how to enter and examples of past finalists can be found here: https://dpa.portrait.gov.au/

 

2015 Winner: Isabelle de Kleine

Isabelle joined The Edge on a six week residency in early 2016. To find out about her artistic practice and what she got up to at The Edge, check out this blog post and short video: Isabelle de Kleine: The beauty of psychological mis-interpretation

You can also learn more about Isabelle, through her Facebook page.

Image credit: Gertrude Street Projection Festival 2016. Photo by Gareth Sobey via Broadsheet

 


Call for entries – Digital Portraiture Award

NPG_ background image

The National Portrait Gallery has opened the Call for Entries for the annual Digital Portraiture Award, where an artist will win $10,000 cash and an artistic residency valued at $10,000 with The Edge.


Now in its fifth year, the Award seeks to extend the traditional notion of portraiture to the digital realm and encourages creative thinking.

‘In a world dominated by Google, Facebook and Twitter – where the adage ‘you are what you eat’ has become ‘you are what you tweet’ – data is a conduit of identity,’ said Gill Raymond, Online Manager at the Portrait Gallery.

‘The Portrait Gallery has always been interested in exploring the possibilities of portraiture and, while digital art as a medium has been around for decades, the genre of portraiture in this space is still evolving.

‘The Digital Portraiture Award is a unique opportunity for digital artists to help us define what portraiture looks like in the digital age.’

In 2016 the Award is moving in an exciting new direction. The Portrait Gallery is now offering one award category open to all entrants over the age of 18 consisting of $10,000 cash and an artistic residency valued at $10,000 with The Edge, at the State Library of Queensland, one of Australia’s leading centres for the development of contemporary art across digital technologies.

The Digital Portraiture Award highlights the Gallery’s commitment to screen-based narratives and digital technology. The highest quality works addressing identity and portraiture will be selected for exhibition and displayed in National Portrait Gallery from 2 December 2016.

The work of the Award finalists will also be available on the Portrait Gallery website extending the outreach potential of digital art to regional Australia and reinforcing the Gallery’s commitment to young and emerging artists.

The Digital Portraiture Award 2016 will be displayed at the National Portrait Gallery from 2 December 2016 to 9 April 2017.

Call for Entries closes 30 September 2016. More information on how to enter and examples of past finalists can be found here: https://dpa.portrait.gov.au/

 

2015 Winner: Isabelle de Kleine

Isabelle joined The Edge on a six week residency in early 2016. To find out about her artistic practice and what she got up to at The Edge, check out this blog post and short video: Isabelle de Kleine: The beauty of psychological mis-interpretation

You can also learn more about Isabelle, through her Facebook page.

Image credit: Gertrude Street Projection Festival 2016. Photo by Gareth Sobey via Broadsheet

 


DIY School Holiday Activities

Guest Post by Moreton Bay Regional Libraries

MAKEIT Workshops banner

Last school holidays, Moreton Bay Library staff dusted off their facilitator skills and provided local kids with an opportunity to create kaleidoscopes and periscopes, using The Edge’s MAKEIT Workshop Plans and Light Box kit.


Overall, 75 kids were engaged with the STEAM programs and feedback was very positive, including the one that brought music to everyone’s ears – “And it works too!”

Burpengary Library further extended their participant’s experience in the Periscope Workshop by adding a viewing challenge after the creation of their periscope. Each child’s finished product was used to view items located in cardboard boxes with small periscope sized openings.

After viewing each item, children wrote the name of each object on a challenge sheet and then took the first letter from each object’s name to create a special word.

The objects used were; sand, umbrella, boat, map, apple, ring, iPad, Nutella, and egg.
The special word was; Submarine.

MAKEIT Activity

MAKEIT- Periscope - Using a Periscope sml

 

Download

 

More about Moreton Bay Libraries

Moreton Bay Regional Libraries received a 2015 National Science Week MAKEIT Light Box, made and delivered by The Edge.

If you’d like to know more about the Light Boxes, you can read about them here:

 


AUXILIARY PLUS

AUXILIARY is calling for applicants for AUXILIARY PLUS – a six week foundational Industrial Design course that teaches sketching, lo-fi prototyping and CAD. It is open to students, professionals and creatives wanting to supercharge their design skills.


AUXILIARY PLUS is also a preparatory primer for the client sponsored AUXILIARY X programme. Students from the inaugural AUXILIARY X programme recently won big in The Australian Good Design Awards’ Young Australian Design Awards category providing a shining representation of innovative Queensland design.

After almost 50 students entered and 9 finalists selected, the winners were announced at the Good Design Awards Gala Night in Sydney on May 27th. Three AUXILIARY finalists took away 3 awards on the night from the 5 available – an outstanding achievement considering competition from prestigious institutions such as UTS, UNSW and Monash.
 

TomAngeDave

 

Angelina Kwan’s Air-O Pan project won the Technology Award. Air-O Pan combines the cooking technologies of an induction fry pan, air fryer, wok, steamer and even a steam oven into one easy to use appliance.
 
Angelina_Air-O-Pan

 

Thomas Costello’s Botany project won the Sustainability Award. Botany is a vertical aeroponic garden designed to be a simple and attractive micro-farming solution for high density urban homes and apartments where home grown food is either inconvenient or impossible, which meets an ever growing current market trend.
 
Thomas_Botany

 

David Chapman’s Essence  project won People’s Choice. Essence unlocks natural properties found in household plants; to preserve food and repel insects through air oxidisers and fragrances and even includes a self-watering system.
 
Dave_Essence

 

The 14 week AUXILIARY X programme where the above work was created saw students produce innovative and high resolution concepts for client Sunbeam Australia. Throughout the programme students were armed with the tactical, practical and strategic skills needed to meet the demands of a real world client, and the outcome speaks for itself. The entire design process behind each of these amazing projects was realised in The Edge’s Fabrication Lab, which provided all the necessary tools and resources under the one roof to enable the next generation of designers bring their ideas to life.

The deadline for AUXILIARY PLUS applications is Friday, June 24. Details of the forthcoming AUXILIARY X programme will be announced over the coming months.

For more information visit auxdesignschool.com.au or contact AUXILIARY at contact@auxdesignschool.com.au


Catching a Joule Thief in the act…

joule_thief2

 

The Edge Programming team has been exploring ways to make use of the Joule thief circuit, which as the name suggests dangles a tantalizing prospect of getting energy out of systems that usually want to keep it to themselves. Think squeezing the last drops of power from an apparently dead battery, or harvesting the trickle of electricity that comes out of a recycled computer fan you hang off your bicycle, or using finger power to light an LED (which is our latest project, currently being road tested by willing workshop participants and pictured above).

LEDS are fiendishly efficient devices for turning a small voltage into light, and the least power hungry forms (red or green) only need 1.2 to 1.5 volts to work. But what if your device only puts out 1.0 volt? You run into an unforeseen pothole while riding your bike in the dark, with unfortunate results. Enter the Joule thief, which has the ability to capture small amounts of energy, stack them up and let them loose in a rush of 1.5 volt LED brightening goodness – and at about 200 thousand times a second, which is fast enough that your eye can’t tell that the LED is flickering at all.

Using the time worn analogy of electricity as water flowing through a pipe… think about when you are out watering the garden, and the water is only coming out of the hose at a trickle (not enough to reach your petunias, or to light an LED, anyway). If you squeeze the hose for a bit, the water pressure will build up, and when you let go, a burst of water will shoot out, reaching further than before (and with enough energy to fire up the LED). Keep doing this very, very fast, and it looks like the water now magically reaches further than it should – just as the Joule Thief seems to magically make more energy appear where there wasn’t enough before.

Nerd Alert: detailed technical explanation likely to provoke flaming comments follows…

joule_thief_diagram

The illustration above is the simplest form of a Joule thief we have found.

It only has three parts …

  • A transistor (the blue thing), which is like a tap – when it is on, electricity can go through it
  • A resistor (the brown thing), which just regulates the flow of power a bit, and
  • A toroid (the green thing), which is a doughnut shaped magnet with two parallel wires wrapped around it, with the end of one wire attached to the beginning of the other. This is the magic bit.

The red and black wires are where the power comes in and out, and the orange bits are where you attach the LED.

So, how does this technicolour marvel work? Thanks to Colin Mitchell (who lives in Dingley – which is in Victoria, and not the dell), this is as good an explanation as I have found (it might help to remember that energy flows from red to black in electrical circuits, and that changing magnetic flux can induce a voltage in a nearby wire, as well as vice versa):

  • A small amount of power flows into the green wires, and turns on the transistor
  • This changing current interacts with the magnetic field of the toroid, and induces an increasing voltage in the solid green wire, which feeds back to increase the voltage in the wire that turns on the tap in the transistor. This process continues as the transistor is turned on more and more until…
  • The transistor can’t turn on any further, and the voltage stops increasing in the solid green wire. No increase means no voltage induced in the other wire, the voltage starts to fall, and the tap starts to turn off
  • The magnetic flux whizzing around in the toroid starts collapsing, and as it does, the tap turns off completely.
  • The magnetic flux continues to collapse, and now induces a high voltage in the solid green wire – but in the opposite direction to before (remember these wires are connected top to tail)
  • This voltage gets high enough for the energy to flow through the LED (because the transistor is switched off, now), and light is emitted as a result
  • Once the voltage coming from the collapsing magnetic flux in the toroid is no longer enough to jump through the LED, you are back where you started, and the transistor begins to turn on again….

Joule_Thief

 

So, what are we doing with the Joule Thief… as it’s a simple circuit that only requires a small amount of energy (even finger power), its perfect to use in workshops where we don’t want get bogged down in the finer details of circuitry (you can very easily end up in a worm hole), and where everyone walks away with a working prototype. We’ve used the Joule Thief circuit it to run workshops at the Woodford Folk Festival earlier this year, and it’s also being delivered as part of the Independent Schools Queensland, Maker Spaces Roadshow where we’re delivering a ‘Making STEM’ workshop for educators. Also, before the year is out we’ll have done more testing and development, refining the learnings and outcomes and packaging it into an Edge MAKEIT Kits.


NIME Unconference Interview with Kate Thomas

Live instrumentation doesn’t stop at guitar, bass and drums. In addition to acoustic instruments there are an increasing number of performers making use of DIY controllers and unique hardware in their performances. NIME (New Interfaces for Musical Expression) is the premier conference in designing human-computer interfaces and interactions for musical performance.


In 2016 NIME comes to Brisbane gathering researchers and practitioners together around lectures, installations, concerts, demonstrations and workshops at Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University. The Unconference will be held at The Edge featuring workshops, demonstrations, panels and performances open to the public.

As a warm-up to the event here’s Unconference director Lloyd Barrett talking with local musician Kate Thomas (Feet Teeth, Spirit Bunny) about her augmented instruments and re-purposing of old technology in live performance.

KT_plays

 

I’d like to you to tell me a little bit about your musical background.

I first started playing piano when I was quite young – maybe 7 or 8? I wanted to learn because my best friend was learning. Then she quit. Then I wanted to quit but Mum wouldn’t let me (on principle). So I got lessons for a few more years, and when I was in my early teens I started to learn drums. I played in a ‘percussion orchestra’ throughout High School. It was a pretty unconventional learning program, none of that formalised AMEB-type stuff, we learned songs and then we played gigs. So performance has always been a big part of what music is for me.

So how did you evolve from that towards more “experimental” live performance?

I chose to go to university to do music because I hadn’t really given life much thought and it seemed like a logical thing to do after finishing school. Due to an admin error I ended up missing out on a position in the Music course in my first year out, so I did a year of Humanities subjects. (That year was awesome and I still draw upon ideas I learned during that year for compositions today.) Studying music at university was a ripper opportunity, but not for any of the reasons that I thought it would be. It was about meeting people and learning a whole new way of listening and thinking about sound. My instrumental skills have progressed at a pretty glacial rate, but the thinking behind what I do, how I approach my performance, composition and collaborative practices is constantly evolving.

FeetTeethfromWebsite

 

I recall seeing you perform in Joel Saunders group in the late 00s.

I met Joel while we were both studying. We didn’t collaborate much while we were at university, but have been involved in a number of bands together since then. Actually, my first gig with Joel was a ‘back-up’ singer accompanying him while he sang along to his iPod in a reading room in a Brisbane City Council library. I didn’t know any of the songs, but by the sound of it neither did he. That show definitely marked a turning point in my musical career. He’s fantastically active, and his approach to music making is inimitable. It’s a real privilege to get to work with the guy.

I understand Feet Teeth, your group with Joel and Paul Young, play improvised music?  How does the group come to a consensus about individual contribution and to what degree does the balance of instrumentation define the outcome?

We’ll have different approaches to our rehearsal process and performance frameworks depending on the context of the performance, and any potential collaborators. It’s been a great vehicle for exploration; we’ve worked with dancers, visual artists, installation artists, video artists, poets and of course, other musicians. We just released a new single from one of 2 albums we’re launching in July. Both albums have been extracted from a 10-hour recording session where we had a bunch of friends joining in at various stages of the session.

I understand you are concerned with gesture in a musical and performative sense.  Do you find building / hacking your instruments allows you more freedom to explore this area?

Freedom was the idea. It was thwarted by the realisation that there are a whole heap of steps or considerations in the process, and actually a huge body of knowledge associated with each step; e.g. designing and building the sensor interface (electronics and performance gesture transference), mapping gestures to sound (dramaturgical and practical considerations), designing and building a digital audio processing environment, composing for the system and developing a level of fluency with the system that would get me to the point of public performance. So yeah, the idea was freedom but the reality of that process was pretty daunting!

KateThomas_gear

 

Tell us about your integration of the Commodore 64 in performance.  How did you come to use it?  How are you using it live?  What did you have to do to get it functioning as performative hardware? 

The C64s have become my primary compositional and performance tool over the last 5 years. Joel first lent me one and I had no idea what it was. It sat in the corner of my room for 6 months. But once I had figured out how to plug it in, and what it could do….
I play 2 x C64s. The both run ‘Cynthcart’ – a program on cartridge developed by Paul Slocum specifically to convert the C64 into a synth. I send a signal from each console to a small mixer and that’s sent as a single signal to an amp.

spirit_bunny_live

 

How does Spirit Bunny fit into all this?  Less improvised?  More electronic?  
Bam. You said it. I don’t really see the point in being in 2 bands that are making the same kind of music. Spirit Bunny can be really challenging for me. I have a hard time following ‘rules’ when it comes to music; I tend to change my lines on the fly, I don’t mind much if I make mistakes. I can’t really get away with that in SB though – plus we work on making the songs really tight. They sound better tight so I’m motivated to try and stay focussed. I also have a lot more responsibility for the ‘success’ of a song in Spirit Bunny. In a lot of the other bands I’ve played in my parts have been ornamentation; in SB if I get it wrong things get dire fast. So while it can be stressful sometimes, I really like the new challenges. And the music. The music is pretty cool too.

KateThomas_shadow

 

Din Mutations… tell us more about that.  Is it more a performative or compositional project? 

Din Mutations has been hibernating for a while now, but I hope it will reawaken one day. It’s more centred on performance practice. It’s origins date back to experiments in 2005 – feeling unsatisfied with the laptop as a performance tool I began to dabble in amateur electronics to build my own performance interfaces. It was (is?) an attempt to marry my electronic music composition with my performance practice by ‘augmenting’ acoustic instruments with sensors that control digital sound generating/processing environments.

You also have something of a history hacking hardware for art shows / installations am I right?

I have had a few installation works shown in visual art shows. I love working in different contexts; audiences can react entirely differently to same piece.

Anything else we should know about you?  Future plans?

I just started full time work as a classroom teacher in a primary school. It’s awesome and requires heaps of creativity and flexibility. It probably means that my music practice will need to be iced for a bit but I’m ok with that. Creative processes have their own seasons and if I have a lull I know that I’ll come out of that with a bunch of new ideas and experiences to draw on.


NIME conference is presented in Brisbane, Australia from 11-14 July at Griffith University South Bank with the NIME Unconference presented at The Edge on July 15.
You can book for all the Unconference talks and workshops at The Edge, via the What’s On calendar.

Kate Thomas will present as part of the Local Innovators Panel on Friday afternoon at The Edge, and perform with Feet Teeth in the evening.


A sense of place

Guest post by, Darren Harris

What does the word ‘landscape’ mean to you?

It means many things to many different people, including a beautiful place, a spiritual connection with the land, a painting, a photograph, somewhere to holiday away from the city, land to be topographically surveyed, a garden to be landscaped, a backdrop to be developed.


To me it means a sense of place. That is, a felt sense of where I feel connected to life and at home, where the land whispers a quiet authentic dignity that speaks to my heart and soul.

At its heart, Where the Land Meets The Sea explores the search for connection with the land and spirit. Up until the age of five, I grew up in Norfolk, England, at a place called Gorleston-On-Sea, and I have fond memories of the land near the water, including the woodlands, meadows, moors, the stony ‘beaches’ and the flat horizon of the sea.

North To Lennox Point

North To Lennox Point_11

Fast forward some 40 years to Brisbane, and my life has taken a sudden left turn – newly separated, living alone in rental, undergoing forced time out from work, all strong ingredients for a mid life crisis and a struggle for meaning.

Eventually, from the ashes of grief, rose in me the desire to explore, to discover, to create, to contribute on a deeper level. I wanted to bring my separate interests together, so I could live a more integrated and fulfilling life, and rediscover who I was and my sense of place. Could the music reflect what I felt and tried to capture in the photographs?  Could the photographs inspire music?

From Lennox Point To Broken Head and Cape Byron

From Lennox Point To Broken Head and Cape Byron

It was during this time that I discovered The Producer’s Club, at The Edge. The Producer’s Club really helped me to refine my music through invaluable support and feedback. It still does and is a wonderful group.

Fast forward again to 30 June 2016, and it’s opening night of my exhibition Where The Land Meets The Sea, 16 large, toned black and white landscape photographs and a 58 minute CD of landscape music that evoke the sense of place in the photographs.

Facing Island

Facing Island

 

The exhibition also features an interactive video “What does the word landscape mean to you?”, where participants can be recorded contributing to a broader dialogue of our understanding of perceptions of the land.

Come along and see the exhibition, listen to the evocative music and be a part of a communal dialogue about landscape, with liked-minded people.

WHEN:
Thursday 30 June 2016 to Sunday 10 July 2016.
Opening Night Thursday 30 June 6pm – 8.30pm (Artist’s talk 7pm).

WHERE:
The Edge, State Library of Queensland, Stanley Place, Cultural Centre, Southbank.

www.darrenjharris.com

 

Darren J Harris

Darren J Harris

 


The Design Kids

Guest post by, Chloe Anna

I’m Chloe Anna – I put my hand up to get involved with The Design Kids and host their monthly Brisbane events almost 2 years ago now and it was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made.


tdk1_v2

Before I jump into me, myself and I. I’ll start with a question many people ask me, who are The Design Kids (TDK)?

The Design Kids bridges the gap between design college students and the professional industry within the Graphic Design community. We work with second & third year students and fresh new grads, and offer them industry knowledge, exposure and opportunities in the industry vital to securing a dream job in graphic design, typography and illustration.

 

tdk2

Now to another question I get asked a lot – who is this Frankie you speak of?

Frankie Ratford started TDK in September 2009 and she likes to do five things at once. She has worked as a print designer, lecturer, intern, blogger, freelancer, book binding and run many collaborations across Australia. She does regular speaking events, volunteers where ever she can and is now on board the #TDKusa RV cruising around the USA and Canada building the TDK empire!

tdk3

While Frankie gets to live like a nomad and travel the world spreading the TDK love – the city hosts (which includes me) are livin’ it up at home building strong creative communities. I love what I do with TDK – I believe it’s important for young creatives to understand the design community and where they can potentially slot in in the future. I’m currently responsible for the Brisbane Facebook group and #TDKTuesdays (our monthly meet ups) – so if you’re ever free on the first Tuesday of the month – get involved and come and find us at #TDKTuesdays.

The next TDK event at The Edge is Tuesday 2 August > PRINT’S NOT DEAD!