Tag Archives: libraryhack

Libraryhack winners announced

After more than 11 000 downloads of data made available by participating state and national libraries more than 150 entries were generated for the Libraryhack competition. Many of these entries will now be added to the collections of libraries across Australia and the National Library of New Zealand.

Of these 150 entries, the following winners were selected announced at the award ceremony hosted by The Edge:

National winners:
Application / data mashup – Michael Henderson for Talking Maps
Photo mashup – Andrew Young for Reflection of Time
Digital media mashup – Mark Bilandzic and John Howland for Glorious Image Viewer

Queensland winners (Sponsored by OPAL)
Application / data mashup – Sam Cavanagh for Conviz
Photo mashup – Andrew Young for Emu Racing
Digital media mashup – River Petein for Soldier of the willow meets the 16th battalion

NSLA library staff winners:
Neal Fitzgerald from State Library of Queensland for SLQ estate maps overlaid on Google Earth
Molly Tebo from State Library of Western Australia for Welcome to the future
Deborah White from State Library of New South Wales for Carved trees: their birth death and rebirth

Ideas prize – Diana Iles for Discovery

Prior to the award ceremony, guests were treated to an exhibition of entries from the competition, ranging from interactive installations and digital displays to a gallery of printed works.

The gallery of entries will remain on show at The Edge throughout July and until 1 August.


The Sweet Sound of History:

Of the masterpieces submitted to Libraryhack, most were created from the extensive collections of photos, maps and newspapers made available by participating libraries.

But where do you start when you want to hack sound?

This was the problem faced by Andrei Maberley, Sound Catalyst at The Edge, when he came across a collection of old copyright free scores housed at The State Library of Queensland. These scores had been captured as images, and while they held the promise of sounds to come, were as yet, unusable for musicians and remixers.

So Andrei went to work and it was, by no means, a quick or easy task.

The original files were medium to low resolution images and Andrei’s ultimate goal was to convert these to MIDI files, sound files that could be used in sound editing software. Many programs were put to the test, Sebelius, Sharpeye and an open source musical optical character recognition program, to no result before Andrei realised that the resolution of the images was causing the problem.

With the help of State Library staff, Andrei got hold of some higher resolution TIFF files. After enlisting The Edge’s designer, Brett, he proceeded to convert the high resolution TIFF files into black and white image files. Any embedded images and lyrics then had to be removed in preparation for the files to be transferred to MIDI.

In the end Andrei created 420 files, ready to re-scan, turn into MIDI files, and re-name from a random number (402054.jpg) into a score title (Mafeking Walz.MIDI).

Thanks to Andrei’s persistence, passion and technical expertise we now have a select number of digitised scores in MIDI. Sharpeye came through in the end, but Andrei still had to hand correct notes that were lost in transition. These files have made the ‘hip hop hack’ workshops possible and Andrei also developed his own ‘Hack to the Future’ music remixing workshops using Ableton Live.

We would like to officially thank Andrei for his all his masterful work and the outstanding contribution that he has made to The State Library of Queensland and the Libraryhack project.

Here is an example of some of the new musical works created from the MIDI files.
Andrei Maberley: Edge Elegy
River Petein: Soldiers of the willow meets the 16th Battalion



Shockwave gets Libraryhacked

Central Queensland youth arts festival Shockwave returns to Blackall in June – and our very own Candy B and Andrei Maberley will be there to fly The Edge flag!

The theme for Shockwave in 2011 is “Flick The Switch” and you can expect an appropriately high-energy event! The program includes workshops, live music, DJs, dance performances, installations, exhibitions from local artists, photography, poetry, computer games, chill-out spaces and a skate competition.

Edge Catalysts Candy and Andrei will be leading a Hip Hop Hack workshop on Saturday June 4 as part of Shockwave. Candy and Andrei will be mashing up spoken word and poetry with texts, images and maps unique to the Blackall library collections and more inspiration for performance and entries for the Libraryhack competition.

If you’re in the area, be sure to check out Shockwave! Become a fan of Shockwave on Facebook for more updates.

Shockwave Festival 2011
10.30am-11.30pm Saturday June 4
9.00am-12.00 noon Sunday June 5
Where: Blackall Memorial Hall & Skate Park
Cost: FREE


Colleen’s Data Vis Presentation for LibraryHack

If you couldn’t make it to The Edge’s “Letting The Data Loose” workshop last week, when our Catalyst Colleen gave a lesson on creating data visualisations, fear not. You can watch a video of the workshop here:

Or check out Colleen’s slides from the presentation here:

Library Hack – It’s Time to Let the Data Loose  

Colleen had some great tips that will help you prepare an entry for the Libraryhack competition in no time. And why wouldn’t you enter? You could win up to $6000 in prize money or an iPad2.


Libraryhacking it up (Pt. 2)

So today I had another bash at a bit of a Libraryhack image remix from SLQ’s copyright free image collection. (You can see the first one here.)

This time I had the idea first and found images to match it. I first searched for ‘boat’ in the SLQ Flickr collection, then grabbed a couple of images with people in them and began to crop, copy, paste and arrange.

Here’s the result:

Image of boats with cut out faces from old photos pasted onto them, with the text 'BOAT PEOPLE' wirtten underneath in bold.

'Boat People' by Ray Bourne

 



Libraryhacking it up

So for Libraryhack Amanda and myself had a bash at ‘remixing’ an image from The State Library of Queensland’s copyright-free database of images.

On the 2nd page of images I got inspired by the flower on the jacket of this gentleman.

I came up with some text, threw it into Photoshop on one of The Edge Macs, then passed it on to Amanda who touched up the flower then edited the text in In Design.

Here’s what we came up with:

Old image of gentleman with pink flower on jacket. Text reads: "So you don't support same sex marriage? Even I know that's SO last century!"

Ray and Amanda's Libraryhack effort


Libraryhacking it up

So for Libraryhack Amanda and myself had a bash at ‘remixing’ an image from The State Library of Queensland’s copyright-free database of images.

On the 2nd page of images I got inspired by the flower on the jacket of this gentleman.

I came up with some text, threw it into Photoshop on one of The Edge Macs, then passed it on to Amanda who touched up the flower then edited the text in In Design.

Here’s what we came up with:

Old image of gentleman with pink flower on jacket. Text reads: "So you don't support same sex marriage? Even I know that's SO last century!"

Ray and Amanda's Libraryhack effort


Visualising Disaster

The devastating effects of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in Japan have been tragic to watch, as the death toll climbs and the rebuilding begins.

The days since the quake have highlighted how technology continues to change the way we process and react to disasters. News filters out through social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook, and concerned family and friends can search for the missing via Google Person Finder.

Then there are people using online tools to visually represent the scale of the disaster. You’ve probably seen the dramatic before and after satellite images. Now Visualizing.org is looking for designers to submit visualisations of the natural disaster.

“We’re interested in both the earthquake and the ensuing wave – in other words, you might focus on either phenomenon or a combination of the two. You may focus solely on the Japan quake, consider the deeper context of quake/wave history, or think about the broader scope of all natural catastrophes.”

The site suggests a range of public data that’s available for mining, and highlights some examples of existing data visualisations.

The NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory released a data visualisation of the estimated size of the tsunami (pictured, and here) – estimating anticpated wave heights as the effects of the earthquake moved across the Pacific Ocean. The highest waves (black) are near the quake epicentre, obviously, becoming lower as they get further away (orange/yellow), and then getting taller again near coastal areas (red).

In another example, designer Isao Matsunami turned to the rescue efforts and plotted the accessibility of roads in affected areas in the days following the disaster. Over a Google Earth map he layered data from Honda cars with “InterNavi” and GPS systems, which tracked where those cars were travelling and at what speed.

Visualizing.org describes itself as “a community of creative people working to make sense of complex issues through data and design… and a shared space and free resource to help you achieve this goal.” The site helps designers showcase their work and get feedback, see how other designers are working, and access public data. Plus there are regular challenges for data design, like this one.

Closer to home, Libraryhack is looking for ideas for mash-ups and apps using data from Australian and New Zealand libraries. It’s well worth brainstorming some suggestions for the Libraryhack Ideas Competition – there’s a $1000 prize for the best idea. Entries close on April 30. Libraryhack are also running workshops and events – head to the website to find out more.

Have you ever tried making a data visualisation? What kind of data visualisations would you be interested in seeing?