Tag Archives: Pro Tools

Mastering Souncrane: Astroboy fights Tsunami with soX!

Soundcrane is a project where ‘Australian musicians cover Japanese compositions to raise money for the disaster relief effort.’ I’ve just completed the mastering for this project in at The Edge’s Lab3.  Check it out and buy a track for a good cause at Bandcamp!

I don’t usually do mastering so I was on the hunt for a resampling tool to use for this project. Re-sampling is the process of up or down sampling digital audio.  The sample rate for CDs is 44,100 samples per second. In this case I want to go up 96,000 or 96k as some of the plug-ins I use sound better at higher sample rates. I also needed to get back down to 44.1k for the final output to be posted on bandcamp. Downsampling badly can make time spent in mastering tweaking subtle details wasted and is generally a bit of a black art in digital audio. Wikipedia has the details of course.

With the criteria of free, open source and cross-platform I went to to Infinite Wave Mastering’s awesome sample rate comparison site. I found soX – an audio processing toolkit that on spec beats pretty much every other tool out there.  Its a command line tool but if thats too geeky for your, you can use as a plug-in for foobar – a free audio process tool for windows.

 

 

 


Mastering Souncrane: Astroboy fights Tsunami with soX!

Soundcrane is a project where ‘Australian musicians cover Japanese compositions to raise money for the disaster relief effort.’ I’ve just completed the mastering for this project in at The Edge’s Lab3.  Check it out and buy a track for a good cause at Bandcamp!

I don’t usually do mastering so I was on the hunt for a resampling tool to use for this project. Re-sampling is the process of up or down sampling digital audio.  The sample rate for CDs is 44,100 samples per second. In this case I want to go up 96,000 or 96k as some of the plug-ins I use sound better at higher sample rates. I also needed to get back down to 44.1k for the final output to be posted on bandcamp. Downsampling badly can make time spent in mastering tweaking subtle details wasted and is generally a bit of a black art in digital audio. Wikipedia has the details of course.

With the criteria of free, open source and cross-platform I went to to Infinite Wave Mastering’s awesome sample rate comparison site. I found soX – an audio processing toolkit that on spec beats pretty much every other tool out there.  Its a command line tool but if thats too geeky for your, you can use as a plug-in for foobar – a free audio process tool for windows.

 

 

 


Plug-ins. From the ridiculous to the ridiculously expensive…

At the workshop on the weekend I gave a quick overview of writing music with the inbuilt instruments in Pro Tools. We didn’t really have time to explore the world of 3rd party software, so I thought I’d post a few resources for RTAS and VST plug-ins.  These plug-ins are often cross-platform, mac or pc, and whatever program you are using to write music there will be something useful, or at least quirky and fun.

First up is kvraudio, the grandaddy of plug-in sites. Basically if a plug-in exists, then it is on KVR somewhere. This is my favorite place to find whacked out sound creating (and destroying) tools.  There is an unusually useful site search engine here, which can be tweeked to show only free or unreleased plug-ins. Because of this site I was inspired (or fooled) into setting myself the challenge of writing for a kids TV series using only weird and wonderful sounds. I failed of course – but glitch , nutseq, polyiblit and drumatic were the soundtrack to my life for a while.

Cheap and blippy is not to your taste? Fancy yourself as the next Stravinsky? Then have a listen to the ‘Rite of Spring’ made using the Vienna Symphonic Library. Believe it or not, this is entirely programmed on a bunch of fast computers, using the VSL’s enormous, gigantic, huge, monstrously expensive sample library.  How big? Well the largest, most expensive version has over 1 million samples, on 42 DVDs. For the cost of a small car (about $15,ooo AUD) you can have virtual versions of pretty much every single orchestral instrument ever made.  The funny thing is – compared to actually recording a real orchestra of top players, or event the cost of a single good violin, 15k is a bargain.

Obviously, meticulously sampling real musicians is an expensive business, but there are some much cheaper sample libraries out there, like the Miroslav Philharmonik collection. If you hunt around you can find it for 1% of the price of the VSL monster collection, and its definitely not 99% worse.

Before you go installing the lastest crazy find – please remember that some of these freeware plug-ins can be …unpredictable…and its worthwhile taking note of what you’ve installed,  so you can trash it later just in case.

Happy plug-in hunting!


Plug-ins. From the ridiculous to the ridiculously expensive…

At the workshop on the weekend I gave a quick overview of writing music with the inbuilt instruments in Pro Tools. We didn’t really have time to explore the world of 3rd party software, so I thought I’d post a few resources for RTAS and VST plug-ins.  These plug-ins are often cross-platform, mac or pc, and whatever program you are using to write music there will be something useful, or at least quirky and fun.

First up is kvraudio, the grandaddy of plug-in sites. Basically if a plug-in exists, then it is on KVR somewhere. This is my favorite place to find whacked out sound creating (and destroying) tools.  There is an unusually useful site search engine here, which can be tweeked to show only free or unreleased plug-ins. Because of this site I was inspired (or fooled) into setting myself the challenge of writing for a kids TV series using only weird and wonderful sounds. I failed of course – but glitch , nutseq, polyiblit and drumatic were the soundtrack to my life for a while.

Cheap and blippy is not to your taste? Fancy yourself as the next Stravinsky? Then have a listen to the ‘Rite of Spring’ made using the Vienna Symphonic Library. Believe it or not, this is entirely programmed on a bunch of fast computers, using the VSL’s enormous, gigantic, huge, monstrously expensive sample library.  How big? Well the largest, most expensive version has over 1 million samples, on 42 DVDs. For the cost of a small car (about $15,ooo AUD) you can have virtual versions of pretty much every single orchestral instrument ever made.  The funny thing is – compared to actually recording a real orchestra of top players, or event the cost of a single good violin, 15k is a bargain.

Obviously, meticulously sampling real musicians is an expensive business, but there are some much cheaper sample libraries out there, like the Miroslav Philharmonik collection. If you hunt around you can find it for 1% of the price of the VSL monster collection, and its definitely not 99% worse.

Before you go installing the lastest crazy find – please remember that some of these freeware plug-ins can be …unpredictable…and its worthwhile taking note of what you’ve installed,  so you can trash it later just in case.

Happy plug-in hunting!


PT workshops…Beginner or not? 10 quick questions to check your skill level.

After being relocated to a SLQ conference room while The Edge is being refitted, all went smoothly for the 1st of the new series of workshops. Thanks to all those that came along!

This was the last of the basics workshops and everything form here on in will get a little more advanced and/or specialized. If you are unsure,  here are ten quick questions that you should be able to answer before you’ll get anything out of the next series of workshops.

Can you:

1. Create a new session at 44.1Khz, 24 bit using a default  i/o template, and save it on the correct hard drive.

2. Create, name and delete an audio track, aux track and master track.

3. Import audio into a new Pro Tools track, straight from the Finder and from the File menu.

4. Find an audio file in the region bin and in the Audio Files folder in the Finder.

5. Switch between slip and grid edit mode.

6. Set up a tempo grid.

7. Identify a tempo from one bar of audio, and set that tempo for the whole session.

8. Use tab to transient, cut, copy, paste, duplicate and repeat audio regions.

9. Record a vocal.

10. Bounce a session to disk.

If this is all a bit much and you are still looking to start from scratch, don’t despair – there are regular inductions run at The Edge, and as always, plenty of  resources on the web. Here is a few links for Pro Tools beginners.

Chris Bryant has a great introduction to Pro Tools on here.

For tips and tracks and trouble-shooting you can’t beat the DUC – Avid’s own community forums.  Its a little overwhelming at first, but if you narrow in on the platform you use (Mac/PC) and the type of hardware (PT9, LE, HD or M-powered) there is plenty of help available.

Avid also has TV site, with plenty of info(mercial) type videos, and as always there is youtube.

Good luck!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Pro Tools FAQ videos in Lab 3

Hi all,

I’ve started doing screen capture videos as a FAQ for Lab 3. You can find them in the Movies folder on the Lab 3 computer – not online yet.

They are all “How do i?” type questions, and cover some basics of Pro Tools. Here is what Ive done so far;

01 Create new session, create and delete track
02 Import audio from finder
03 Find Audio in Region Bin and Finder
04 Switch between slip and grid, change to bars and beats
05 Switch to edit command focus and use tab to transient
06 Find 2 bars and separate
07 Turn on tempo ruler and identify beats
08 Set tempo for whole song and clean up start
09 Edit in grid mode and change grid value
10 Record a vocal
11 edit vocal using separate, trim and grab
12 Turn on elastic audio and edit vocal
13 Change to mix view and insert an eq
14 Insert Delay on a vocal.

Have a crack at them and let me know what you think!


Pro Tools FAQ videos in Lab 3.

Hi all,

I’ve started doing screen capture videos as a FAQ for Lab 3. You can find them in the Movies folder on the Lab 3 computer – not online yet.

They are all “How do i?” type questions, and cover some basics of Pro Tools. Here is what Ive done so far;

01 Create new session, create and delete track
02 Import audio from finder
03 Find Audio in Region Bin and Finder
04 Switch between slip and grid, change to bars and beats
05 Switch to edit command focus and use tab to transient
06 Find 2 bars and separate
07 Turn on tempo ruler and identify beats
08 Set tempo for whole song and clean up start
09 Edit in grid mode and change grid value
10 Record a vocal
11 edit vocal using separate, trim and grab
12 Turn on elastic audio and edit vocal
13 Change to mix view and insert an eq
14 Insert Delay on a vocal.

Have a crack at them and let me know what you think!


Another Pro Tools workshop..

Bookings for the next Pro Tools workshop is now open! Due to demand we’ll be running the More than The Basics again, from 5:00 – 7:30 on the 11th of January. We are looking for people who missed out on the first round of workshops to register first.


Two personal records…

I think I’ve just set a new personal record for number of genre’s hopped in one month of work and for number of double shot flat whites in a 24 hour period. First is good. Second is bad.

I’ve gone from a B105 charity rock song that needed a mix (and some severe autotune) to producing a song from a 15th century opera featuring seven sopranos in full voice (who definitely don’t need to be tuned) , to the tracking of some country rock in the leafy hills of Paddington,  to recording a  metal/hardcore band in an industrial no-man’s land on the gold coast.  Number of flat whites? Lets just say that I have ten coffee loyalty card in my wallet…

All great music (or for a great cause), but why am I ranting on about this? Well, if you attend a Pro Tools workshop, we can go through aspects of recording and production, using some of these sessions as examples of what to do (or not!) when faced with different musical genres.  Whatever your musical inclination you should be able to come away with a tip or two, and a better understanding of how to use Lab 3.

UPDATE :  December workshops are booked out, so keep your eyes peeled for the January workshops, and sign up for the newsletter for the latest updates.


Two personal records…

I think I’ve just set a new personal record for number of genre’s hopped in one month of work and for number of double shot flat whites in a 24 hour period. First is good. Second is bad.

I’ve gone from a B105 charity rock song that needed a mix (and some severe autotune) to producing a song from a 15th century opera featuring seven sopranos in full voice (who definitely don’t need to be tuned) , to the tracking of some country rock in the leafy hills of Paddington,  to recording a  metal/hardcore band in an industrial no-man’s land on the gold coast.  Number of flat whites? Lets just say that I have ten coffee loyalty card in my wallet…

All great music (or for a great cause), but why am I ranting on about this? Well, if you attend a Pro Tools workshop, we can go through aspects of recording and production, using some of these sessions as examples of what to do (or not!) when faced with different musical genres.  Whatever your musical inclination you should be able to come away with a tip or two, and a better understanding of how to use Lab 3.

UPDATE :  December workshops are booked out, so keep your eyes peeled for the January workshops, and sign up for the newsletter for the latest updates.