Tag Archives: science

Kitchen Chemistry with Dr Musk

Kitchen Chemistry

You can tell that chemistry is important because of the way we use it in our everyday lives, without even knowing. Washing the clothes, putting a new battery in the remote and baking a cake in the kitchen all rely on simple chemistry to enhance our lives…


…but, what else can you do with the chemistry all around you? Come along to The Edge’s Old-School Chemistry Kit workshop to find out and take home the knowledge and equipment you need to begin your new adventures in science.

Mixing solutions to make bubbles of flammable gas, learning how to get electricity from scrap metal and salty water, or how to give something a shiny copper coating are just some of the tricks included in The Edge’s Old School Chemistry Kit.

Take a trip to the hardware and the pharmacy to find the ingredients you need, borrow a few things from that bulging third drawer in the kitchen, then add the safety knowledge you will learn at The Edge to explore the surprising variety of chemistry that is possible with stuff you pass by every day.

Wrap it all up in the retro design kit we provide and you have the perfect Christmas gift for the budding mad scientist in your family.


There is just one Kitchen Chemistry workshop session on offer, so don’t miss out!

  • Sunday 18 December
  • 1pm-5pm
  • $80
  • No skills required
  • Suitable for ages 16+

BOOK NOW


BrisScience // Mars… could there be life?

This event is not being held at The Edge.

This event is being held at UQ.

 

 

Space. It’s fascinated generations, inspiring scientists and artists alike.

This month our expert panel take an in-depth look at Mars and the future of space travel, while attempting to answer the age-old question… are we alone in the universe?

The panel:

Professor Tamara Davis is a cosmologist interested in investigating new fundamental physics, including the properties of dark energy and dark matter, but has also published on astrobiology. She wants to know whether life on Earth could have originated on Mars.

Professor Gordon Southam is a geomicrobiologist, who uses both biological and geological sciences to examine the bacterial transformations of materials in the earth’s crust. He will argue that we are Martian.

Professor Michael Smart is an engineer and Chair of Hypersonic Propulsion, and is working to revolutionise high-speed transport through clean burning, hydrogen-fuelled engines that could make access to space much easier in the future.

 

Free – Register Here

 

Please note, this is not an Edge event. For any questions regarding this BrisScience event, please click on the ‘Register Here’ button above and connect with the event organiser. Thank you.

BrisScience // Mars… could there be life?

This event is not being held at The Edge.

This event is being held at UQ.

 

 

Space. It’s fascinated generations, inspiring scientists and artists alike.

This month our expert panel take an in-depth look at Mars and the future of space travel, while attempting to answer the age-old question… are we alone in the universe?

The panel:

Professor Tamara Davis is a cosmologist interested in investigating new fundamental physics, including the properties of dark energy and dark matter, but has also published on astrobiology. She wants to know whether life on Earth could have originated on Mars.

Professor Gordon Southam is a geomicrobiologist, who uses both biological and geological sciences to examine the bacterial transformations of materials in the earth’s crust. He will argue that we are Martian.

Professor Michael Smart is an engineer and Chair of Hypersonic Propulsion, and is working to revolutionise high-speed transport through clean burning, hydrogen-fuelled engines that could make access to space much easier in the future.

 

Free – Register Here

 

Please note, this is not an Edge event. For any questions regarding this BrisScience event, please click on the ‘Register Here’ button above and connect with the event organiser. Thank you.

BrisScience // Mars… could there be life?

This event is not being held at The Edge.

This event is being held at UQ.

 

 

Space. It’s fascinated generations, inspiring scientists and artists alike.

This month our expert panel take an in-depth look at Mars and the future of space travel, while attempting to answer the age-old question… are we alone in the universe?

The panel:

Professor Tamara Davis is a cosmologist interested in investigating new fundamental physics, including the properties of dark energy and dark matter, but has also published on astrobiology. She wants to know whether life on Earth could have originated on Mars.

Professor Gordon Southam is a geomicrobiologist, who uses both biological and geological sciences to examine the bacterial transformations of materials in the earth’s crust. He will argue that we are Martian.

Professor Michael Smart is an engineer and Chair of Hypersonic Propulsion, and is working to revolutionise high-speed transport through clean burning, hydrogen-fuelled engines that could make access to space much easier in the future.

 

Free – Register Here

 

Please note, this is not an Edge event. For any questions regarding this BrisScience event, please click on the ‘Register Here’ button above and connect with the event organiser. Thank you.

“Pretty scary, or pretty cool?” How Google Maps has changed the world

Our friends at BrisScience have just uploaded the full video from their latest sell-out event: How Google Maps changed the world.

Future image 854X600 2

 

With over 1 billion active users, Google Maps has changed the way we view and interact with our world forever.
Join the expert panel to discuss some of these obvious – and the not so obvious – change to our everyday lives.

The panel:
Alexandra Geer, ESRI Austraila
Chris Isles, Place Design Group
Dr Peter Scarth, Queensland Department of Science, Information Technology and Innovation
Dr Thomas Sigler, The University of Queensland

BrisScience also have all their other events on their YouTube Channel – UQ Faculty of Science

“Pretty scary, or pretty cool?” comment by Town Planner and panel member: Chris Isles

 

 


Venomous reptiles and their toxins

BrisScience

With chilling tales of dangerous encounters with taipans, king cobras and arctic vipers, komodo dragons, vampire bats and an Antarctic giant octopus, Associate Professor Bryan Fry brings to life his work with venoms and discusses their potential uses for society.

REGISTER HERE

 
 
FREE EVENT / REGISTRATIONS ESSENTIAL

Pushing beyond their importance in maintaining ecological balance, Bryan looks at the world’s most dangerous animals as rich sources of novel compounds for use in drug design and development.

Join him as he takes us on a journey through his passion (some would say obsession) for venoms, and a career that has seen him visit over 40 countries and work with some of the most unique creatures on the planet.

 

FIND OUT MORE

 


Venomous reptiles and their toxins

BrisScience

With chilling tales of dangerous encounters with taipans, king cobras and arctic vipers, komodo dragons, vampire bats and an Antarctic giant octopus, Associate Professor Bryan Fry brings to life his work with venoms and discusses their potential uses for society.

REGISTER HERE

 
 
FREE EVENT / REGISTRATIONS ESSENTIAL

Pushing beyond their importance in maintaining ecological balance, Bryan looks at the world’s most dangerous animals as rich sources of novel compounds for use in drug design and development.

Join him as he takes us on a journey through his passion (some would say obsession) for venoms, and a career that has seen him visit over 40 countries and work with some of the most unique creatures on the planet.

 

FIND OUT MORE

 


Venomous reptiles and their toxins

BrisScience

With chilling tales of dangerous encounters with taipans, king cobras and arctic vipers, komodo dragons, vampire bats and an Antarctic giant octopus, Associate Professor Bryan Fry brings to life his work with venoms and discusses their potential uses for society.

REGISTER HERE

 
 
FREE EVENT / REGISTRATIONS ESSENTIAL

Pushing beyond their importance in maintaining ecological balance, Bryan looks at the world’s most dangerous animals as rich sources of novel compounds for use in drug design and development.

Join him as he takes us on a journey through his passion (some would say obsession) for venoms, and a career that has seen him visit over 40 countries and work with some of the most unique creatures on the planet.

 

FIND OUT MORE

 


Are There Ghosts in Space?

You might laugh at the idea of ghosts in space and the world of theories about non-Earthly beings floating around our universe. But this time the conspiracy theorists might be right as a few happy snaps of the universe show some freaky and supernatural things…

If evidence was ever needed of ghosts and strange beings in space, this would be it. At the same time, there’s a pretty good scientific explanation behind the ghost-like orbs. These photos were released last year from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and are actually images of planetary nebulae in infrared light. These are stars at their last stage of life and they’re running out of fuel (this occurs millions to billions of years after the star has formed). After the sun’s supply of hydrogen in the core is gone, the body develops into giant red stars called ‘red giants’. The red giants eject their outer layers which then expand. It is this process that causes the floating material to glow and have a strange, supernatural presence.

C’mon. This totally looks like something right out X-files. But while you might mistake the above photo for being a pink ghost, it is actually the image of the coldest place in the universe. If you like cold weather the nebula is a brisk -272°C (which is even colder than the afterglow of the Big Bang). This nebula is in the constellation Centaurus and is approximately 5,000 light years away. The interstellar cloud of dust and gas is called the Boomerang Nebula (it was originally thought to have a boomerang, rather than ghostly shape) and was taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.

And here’s an older pic of the nebula in a false-colour recorded image from 1988:

And check out this scary looking, ghost-like space pumpkin! The picture is an X-Ray photo of the Perseus cluster, which is a cluster of thousands of galaxies, immersed in multimillion degree heat and is one of the most massive objects in the universe. The colours show the heat intensity on the X-rays, with the white area being the hottest.

And this photo from ­­­­NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory shows the sun is one smiley dude!

Images taken from: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/picture-galleries/10414092/In-pictures-ghostly-shapes-created-in-the-gas-dust-and-particles-of-outer-space.html?frame=2718097


Mummifying Hearts

Stage 1: Mummification of Heart

Stage 1: Mummification of Heart

During my stint as Fringes Catalyst, I am working on a series of new installation works for display in the main foyer area.  The two primary areas of investigation are botany and consumer/everyday genetics.  As part of my look into consumer genetics and the connections between family and genetic inheritance, I am planning to create an installation incorporating mummified lamb hearts.  The lamb hearts function as a symbol for love, connection and sacrifice.  They will be used to make links between three generations of women within my family.

While I have had some previous experience with mummification, this project (apart from conceptual concerns) also presents a great opportunity to experiment with different mummification strategies and will help refine my mummification recipe.

A Shrine for Algernon: The Remains of Algernon and the Poetry Orchids - mummified fetal calf sculpture with living orchid.

A Shrine for Algernon: The Remains of Algernon and the Poetry Orchids – mummified fetal calf sculpture with living orchid.

The first three hearts have been in salt solution for four weeks now and the flesh is very nice and solid.

Removing hearts from salt compound.

Removing hearts from salt compound.

Mummified heart - post salt compound.

Mummified heart – post salt compound.

Heart after washing off salt compound residue.

Heart after washing off the salt compound.

The fat still contains some moisture, so they will still need further processing before being able to be incorporated into an artwork. To aid the further preservation of the hearts, I am soaking them in taxidermy tanning formula for three days. Following this process, I will put the hearts into the oven for final fixing and to remove moisture again. I am also thinking about placing the hearts in bleach.  This should produce beautiful white specimens that could form a base for printing images.