Tag Archives: the edge

Little BIGSOUND

Little Bigsound

Presented by QMusic and Brisbane City Council, and hosted at The Edge, Little BIGSOUND is a hands-on, one-day experience for 15 – 25 year olds.


Little BIGSOUND will put emerging musicians in direct contact with local influencers that can help them get their first gigs, publicise their music, improve their songwriting or music production, and manage their career development. Artists will also meet other young people in the scene that could become members of their next band – or even the band’s manager!

In a first for Little BIGSOUND, the revamped program allows attendees to select from a variety of sessions between 10am – 4pm, utilising SLQ’s state of the art facilities. The Edge’s Digital Media Lab will transform into The Ableton Live studio; where attendees can get hands-on and make music using the next generation of production software and live instrumentation. Excitingly, the Recording Studio will feature the KORG History of Synths, an interactive installation, taking attendees through the evolution and history of the synthesizer.

The Edge’s Innovation Lab will host interactive sessions covering digital marketing and publicity, with Title Track PR’s Sarah Chipman (Sticky Fingers, Crystal Castles) and Comes With Fries founder Vanessa Picken (The Cat Empire, The Jezabels).

Aspiring and practicing artists, managers, label owners, and publicists wanting to know how to plan a release from start to finish, can jump in on the Circle Of Life session in the Auditorium with Mucho Bravado’s Ben Preece (WAAX, I Know Leopard).

Serious about starting a music business? Julia Bridger (BLEACH Festival, The FarmHouse) and the QMusic team will provide insights on sustainability, structure and income streams to help build your empire.

And, as the sun goes down, Little BIGSOUND will culminate with a free all-ages gig headlined by a secret act to be revealed soon.

 

Gain the practical skills and relationships you need to get started in the music industry!

  • Date: Saturday 29 July 2017
  • Time: 10am to 4pm
  • Venue: The Edge, State Library of Queensland
  • Tickets: $39.80 Limited tickets are on sale now!

BUY TICKETS


Event Program

Saturday 29 July 2017
9:30am REGISTRATION
10:00am AUDITORIUM WELCOME
10:00am – 10:40 AUDITORIUM NETWORKING EVENT
10:45am – 11:15
 
AUDITORIUM MINI KEYNOTE – AIRLING
Hannah Sheppard aka Airling will be sharing insights spanning from being a youth creative trying to make it…
to a triple j album of the week artist playing festivals and touring nationally.
11:30am – 12:20 INNOVATION LAB DIGITAL 101 
Digital fan engagement is as important as putting on a great live show. It allows you to create connections with your audience through learning who they are and what interests them. Vanessa Picken (Comes With Fries) will run you through different digital marketing strategies and how to present yourself online to create cost-effective digital content that cuts through the social media noise.Speaker: Vanessa Picken (Comes With Fries)

 

11:30am – 12:20 AUDITORIUM MUSIC BUSINESS 101 
How can you build your art into a business? Julia Bridger (Bleached Festival, The Farm) and Trina Massey (QMusic Program Manager) will provide insight into the basics of building your art as a creative microbusiness including the ways you can make money to help build your empire.Q&A: Julia Bridger (Bleached Festival, The Farm)
Facilitator: Trina Massey (QMusic)
11:30am – 12:20 WINDOW BAYS ROUND TABLES – BRISBANE BOOKING AGENTS
Intimate groups of 8-10 participants will be paired with experienced industry professionals to discuss the ins and outs of booking. Dispel myths around these roles and open conversation! Little BIGSOUND Round Table Sessions provide a chance to put a name to a face and take the guess work out.Bookers: Ben Collier (Akimbo), Brigid Langford (The Zoo), Dave Sleswick (The Tivoli), Deb Suckling (Live Spark, Brisbane Powerhouse), Julia Bridger (BLEACH Festival/The Farm), Ruby-Jean McCabe (Milk Factory/East Street Markets/Cardigan Bar), Sullivan Patten (Miss Blanks/DJ Samson).
11:30am – 12:20 DIGITAL MEDIA
LABS
ABLETON STUDIO
The Ableton Live recording studio will enable participants to test drive the tools of the next generation of production and live instrumentation. Featuring 16 Ableton Push, participants will be taught the functions of each tool and then be able to program, create, mix and manipulate their own beats and melodies. 
11:30am – 12:20 RECORDING STUDIOS THE HISTORY OF SYNTH
The History of Synth is an interactive product display installation taking participants through the evolution and history of the synthesizer. Composing of 11 instruments, participants are able to interact with each synth creating and replicating sounds from history.
12:30pm – 1:30 LUNCH BREAK AND LIVE PERFORMANCES
Food provided. Watch performances by Asha Jefferies and Ruby Gilbert plus the opportunity to network with speakers and special guests.
1:40pm – 2:30

 

AUDITORIUM GET GOOD
It all comes back to the song. A&R Exec (John Mullen, Dew Process), Artist (Tia Gostelow) and Producer (Konstantin Kersting, Airlock Studios) are going talk about GETTING GOOD and the songwriting process. Find the answers you want about songwriting, A&R, production and how they all fit together.Speakers: John Mullen (Dew Process), Tia Gostelow (Musician), Konstantin Kersting (The Belligerents, Airlock Studios)
Facilitator: Emily Green (QMusic)
1:40pm – 2:30

 

 

INNOVATION LAB PUBLICITY 101
Sarah Chipman owner of Title Track PR, will take participants through a hands-on deconstruction of their own press releases and work through the do’s and don’ts of publicity and press in the music industry. Get the heads up on the ins and outs of what publicists do and what you can do yourself to get the most bang for your buck.Speaker: Sarah Chipman (Title Track PR)
1:40pm – 2:30 WINDOW
BAYS
ROUND TABLES – ARTIST MANAGERS
Intimate groups of 8-10 participants will be paired with experienced industry professionals to discuss the ins and outs of managing artists. Dispel myths around these roles and open conversation! Little BIGSOUND Round Table Sessions provide a chance to put a name to a face and take the guess work out.Artist Managers: Ali Tomoana (Soul Has No Tempo), Ben Lynskey (Amplifire Music), Dan Ceh (Who Agencies), Deena Lynch (Amplifire Music), Jo Pratt (Sage Music), Leanne De Souza (AAM)
1:40pm – 2:30 DIGITAL
MEDIA
LABS
ABLETON STUDIO
The Ableton Live recording studio will enable participants to test drive the tools of the next generation of production and live instrumentation. Featuring 16 Ableton Push, participants will be taught the functions of each tool and then be able to program, create, mix and manipulate their own beats and melodies.
1:40pm – 2:30 RECORDING STUDIOS THE HISTORY OF SYNTH
The History of Synth is an interactive product display installation taking participants through the evolution and history of the synthesizer. Composing of 11 instruments, participants are able to interact with each synth creating and replicating sounds from history.
2:40pm – 3:30 INNOVATION LAB SONG BREAKDOWN – THE KITE STRING TANGLE
How does an ARIA nominated song get written? Join Danny Harley (The Kite String Tangle) as he deconstructs one of his own songs – from where it began, to how it ended. This intimate session will take budding artists and producers through the process of songwriting, production and the thought process behind it all.Speaker: Danny Harley (The Kite String Tangle)
2:40pm – 3:30 WINDOW BAYS ROUND TABLES – PUBLICITY
Intimate groups of 8-10 participants will be paired with experienced industry professionals to discuss the ins and outs of publicity. Dispel myths around these roles and open conversation! Little BIGSOUND Round Table Sessions provide a chance to put a name to a face and take the guess work out.Publicists:  Jess McMahon (Heapsaflash), Nick Lynagh (Habit Music Company), Stephen Green (SGC Media), Tim Price (Collision Course PR), Vivienne Mellish (Mucho Bravado), Zac Fahey (Footstomp Music)

 

2:40pm – 3:30 DIGITAL MEDIA LABS ABLETON STUDIO
The Ableton Live recording studio will enable participants to test drive the tools of the next generation of production and live instrumentation. Featuring 16 Ableton Push, participants will be taught the functions of each tool and then be able to program, create, mix and manipulate their own beats and melodies
2:40pm – 3:30 RECORDING STUDIOS THE HISTORY OF SYNTH
The History of Synth is an interactive product display installation taking participants through the evolution and history of the synthesizer. Composing of 11 instruments, participants are able to interact with each synth creating and replicating sounds from history.
3:35pm – 3:55 AUDITORIUM NETWORKING EVENT

 

4:00pm 7:00pm   RIVER
TERRACE
ALL AGES GIG
As the sun goes down, Little BIGSOUND will culminate with a free all-ages gig headlined by a secret act to be revealed via the Little BIGSOUND Facebook page. Little BIGSOUND pleased to have TØBI and Twelve Past Midnight to perform before the headline act.

 

 

 

For more information and the full program, visit qmusic.com.au

 

 

QMusic is a partner of State Library of Queensland.

 


BrisScience: Fresh Science 2015

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BrisScience is getting fresh with the hottest young scientists from South East Queensland as they go head to head in Fresh Science this August.

Join us to hear leading early career scientists reveal their cutting edge discoveries in the time it takes for a sparkler to burn down.
Who will explain their research the best? Who will leave you hungry for more? Who will you choose as the BrisScience People’s Choice winner for 2015?

Fresh Science is a national competition which helps early-career researchers share their stories of discovery and gain national media coverage for their work.

REGISTER HERE

 


UQ Interaction Design Exhibit

Experience the latest technology projects at the UQ Interaction Design Exhibit! View interactive prototypes developed by UQ’s Bachelor of Multimedia Design and Master of Interaction Design students from the course Physical Computing and Interaction Design Studio.
 

REGISTER HERE

 
The exhibition gives you the opportunity to meet the new generation of Interaction Designers and discover the latest physical computing projects from UQ’s Multimedia and Interaction Design students.

This year’s theme for the studio is ‘Designing for playful and open-ended interactions in everyday life’, and projects will revolve around four key areas – healthy ageing, learning in early years, street computing and social presence and awareness.

Don’t miss a great opportunity to see how multimedia design professionals bridge the gap between the physical and digital world!

WEDNESDAY 3 JUNE 2015
School Groups: 12pm – 5pm
Industry & Public: 5pm – 7pm

If you would like to arrange a group school visit, please email schools@eait.uq.edu.au.

 


AUXILIARY Design Exhibition

Auxiliary Design School

Our designers successfully nailed their final presentation to Sunbeam, and in a flash, the first ever AUXILIARY programme has come to an end. Fourteen intense but rewarding weeks later we are proud to present AUXILIARY’s Alpha Class!
 

AUXILIARY Design School

 

DESIGN EXHIBITION OPEN FROM SATURDAY 23 MAY
AUXILIARY Design School is proud to present our first end-of-programme exhibition. Come and see the results of our designers’ epic efforts from the past 14 weeks as they display design projects produced on site at The Edge’s new Fabrication Lab for our prime industry sponsor Sunbeam Australia. Design concepts for 4 Pines Brewing Company’s Vostok Space Beer programme will also be on display.

 


Venomous reptiles and their toxins

BrisScience

With chilling tales of dangerous encounters with taipans, king cobras and arctic vipers, komodo dragons, vampire bats and an Antarctic giant octopus, Associate Professor Bryan Fry brings to life his work with venoms and discusses their potential uses for society.

REGISTER HERE

 
 
FREE EVENT / REGISTRATIONS ESSENTIAL

Pushing beyond their importance in maintaining ecological balance, Bryan looks at the world’s most dangerous animals as rich sources of novel compounds for use in drug design and development.

Join him as he takes us on a journey through his passion (some would say obsession) for venoms, and a career that has seen him visit over 40 countries and work with some of the most unique creatures on the planet.

 

FIND OUT MORE

 


What do you make when you have a new laser cutter..?

… an egg cup Dalek.
We bet you didn’t see that one coming!

 
Some may say why? Others may say why not…? An egg cup Dalek is a great idea! But frankly, the egg cup doesn’t matter as much as WE HAVE A LASER CUTTER!! You may have thought that the Fabrication Lab couldn’t get much better; that the 3D printers, sewing machines, tools and CNC were pretty cool, but we think we’ve just topped it!

Are you ready to play? Access to the Laser Cutter works like all the other resources in the Fabrication Lab. To book the resource you first need to complete a safety induction. But, we haven’t released any inductions for the Laser Cutter yet. If you’d like to be informed when the inductions are running, register your details with us, and we’ll put you on the priority waiting list.

ADD ME TO THE WAITLIST

 


Cheers to Beck and cake.

Greetings. I’ll keep this brief for once.

It’s my second last week here at The Edge and I feel like my time here has gone by incredibly fast. I cannot attest the same for Beck and Tegan whom, having received the brunt of my rambunctious (and more often than not cringe-worthy) behaviour, are probably ready to break open the champagne.

Speaking of champagne, today was the last day for Sally so it was only fitting that we had some bubbly and cupcakes for lunch. Sophie and I thought that it was possibly a cruel joke, building up our expectations of ‘the real world’. Where else does your supervisor caution you to stop working as it’s time for cake?

party image

Cake has been a good friend to me this week given that I’ve returned to editing the first three case studies that I wrote up. It’s not that I don’t like editing; it’s just that I resent it for forcing me to look back at my own work, which I can never really come around to liking. (I’m fairly certain I briefly touched on this in an earlier post.)

Beck has also been friendly throughout the editing process having substituted her red pen for a less soul-smushing blue Staedtler. She’s still trying to beat the commas out of me (they’re my last wall of defence); fortunately I think that as a result some of her masterful ways are rubbing off.

Once again one of my biggest challenges was cutting down several paragraphs into a matter of lines. Four lines to be precise. It started off being quite difficult but became easier as I grew better at identifying the most important information. And I have to admit that seeing a page full of equal length paragraphs was quite rewarding.

That’s it.


You can’t have your glass half-empty and eat it too

I’m not sure that the title is exactly what I’m looking for in terms of thematic foreshadowing — but my life is full of mixed metaphors, so tough.

I’m proud to announce that I’ve officially hit the halfway mark of my internship with The Edge. 80 hours of intense literary mastication, and I’m beginning to feel like my shiny intern gloss is slowly being scraped away and the soft, mushy parts where my self-esteem used to be are now non-specific clusters of minerals and trauma… I’m completely joking mostly, so far it’s been awesome fun and a really great experience — exactly like the brochure said!

Amongst other things, I’ve finally put the staff profiles behind me. The whole process was quite in-depth and the last points of editing included tone, length (I edited them all to fit in the same amount of lines) and general avoidance of repetition between profiles (particularly members within the same team). I’m glad to be moving on to something new and I’m probably 70% happy with what I handed to Beck, but I suppose that’s always the way with one’s own work. As I’ve said in previous posts, one of the best things I’ve taken from the experience so far is to know when to let go of something, and to also place less emotion into my general work (note the aforementioned transition of mushy parts to non-specific clusters).

Coming up next week I’ll be starting work on writing content for current programs as well as a select few of the previous projects that have gone on here at The Edge. I got to choose from a list and naturally my first pick was the Zombie Climate Apocalypse. I’ll also be writing about the Mad Scientist Tea Party (a great party theme in my opinion) and the Science Fair, so keep your eyes peeled — or for a less coarse approach, pulped — for a look at some of the great stuff from The Edge’s past. I’ll also try to include a couple of the best photos I come across during my digital trawling.

zombie 1

One of the many photos documenting The Edge’s Zombie Climate Apocalypse

I suppose what I was trying to woefully allude to with the title, is that if you don’t have a positive outlook, chances are you’re not going to enjoy your internship/whatever you’re doing. And usually to get to the super-cool-fun-stuff you have to trudge through the tough and tedious, and remaining positive through the latter can sometimes be a mission. So far, that hasn’t been the case in my experience and whether it has been because of the people, the content or the general work environment, even usually menial tasks (e.g. capitalising) at The Edge result in stumbling across something new and interesting.

Wish me luck for the second half of my stay! I’m looking forward to it, but with the finish line imminent I’m not sure whether my own emotional glass is half-full or half-empty. Stay tuned for more self-cognitive epiphanies.

At this monumental point in time, a piece of advice for future interns: always eat the cake. If you don’t it will go stale — or sour if it’s a cheesecake.

 


INTERNal Dialogue: Thinking with words

Today marks the end of my first week as an intern with The Edge (I’ve been told my official title is negotiable, though business cards will not be provided. Check this space later for any further development.)

The first thing I noticed about The Edge was how fantastic the space is; nestled between State Library and the Queensland Art Gallery, you’d not be blamed for missing it. Although I’d moseyed along the boardwalk, right past the office windows countless times, I’d never had the foggiest as to what lay beyond the glass. Inside on the first level are are a bunch of wondrous spaces, filled with couches, beanbags and projector screens that appear out of the ceiling! Combine this with an awesome view of the city and you’ve got a recipe for collaboration and inspiration (or maybe just distraction). But the coolest area, I think, is the basement, where the offices and other dark and mysterious corners can be found.

At one end of the basement is Lab 4, where, amongst other things, you can find a batch of Kombucha Tea (see photo), which the team have used to manufacture a unique fashion line (I’m still trying to get my head around it). At the other end you can find a Nerf Gun surplus, left overs from the last Zombie Climate Apocalypse that the building suffered (I tried to hide my devastation when hearing it was unlikely there would be another during my time here. I may have failed). The Edge is full of the weird and wonderful and has me anxious to start next week.

kombucha tea sustainable clothing

More wonderful and slightly less weird, are the inhabitants of the basement: the staff. The first task I’ve been given is to begin re-drafting staff profiles for the new website. This meant I first needed to spend some time getting to know everyone. Although I could give you a spiel about the particularities of each of the staff I’ve spoken with thus far, it’s suffice to say that they’re about as clever and diverse a bunch of people as you’re likely to find in any basement. Aside from an excellent opportunity to introduce myself and get to know the team, my first task gives me an opportunity to use some of my skills (no one has challenged me to a staring competition yet) in a professional context. It’s very rewarding to be able to begin making connections between your university education and how you might be able to apply it in the real world (thank you QUT).

It’s Friday and 5pm is quickly approaching so you’ll have to wait to hear more about this creative-wonder-factory. Otherwise I’d suggest coming down and having a look for yourself.

Intern out.


Sound Extrusions: Porcelain Reloaded

Plaster molds for the porcelain speakers


Plaster molds for the porcelain speakers
Plaster molds for the porcelain speakers

The “hero shot” in this post (above) is a picture of clay models of the porcelain shapes. They were used to create actual plaster moulds. This is one of the first steps towards the final porcelain speaker shells  the main features of the project. The idea behind creating a porcelain object is very straight forward: once we finish a model in clay, we are ready to cast a plaster mould and use it as a negative shape for later porcelain slip casting. This is the most common approach. The beauty of plaster mould is in the fact that we can replicate the objects many times afterwards (3D printing is also pretty good in that regard, as we saw in the last post!), and that we are able to refine our object to finer detail while editing the plaster mould too. But the biggest advantage compared to a direct modelling approach, is the far greater chance of fault free product in the end, thanks to the process of slip casting.

The intriguing story of the Meissen porcelain manufacture workshop, from the beginning of 18th Century, was covered in one of the previous posts. It gave us an unusual introduction to this exciting material. But let’s leave the mystery of European manufacturing behind us for now, and let’s have a look at the process of porcelain making itself!

Making plaster moulds is in fact an art in itself. The reason for this claim is that complicated shapes require plaster moulds to be “assembled” out of many interlocking pieces. The reason for that is that you have to be able to take the mould apart once the object is casted. The only way to achieve this is to divide the clay model into virtual plains and cast the mould step by step, creating separate interlocking pieces as you go. Even some of the finest porcelain makers and designers leave this process to experienced mould makers.

Another step in the production is the magic of porcelain slip casting — in fact it’s fairly simple, but you wouldn’t know unless you knew what to ask for! By pouring liquid porcelain into the plaster mould we create the porcelain slip. But the real secret is in the plaster itself — more specifically, in the porosity of the material. Plaster in fact, is made of a maze of little tunnels and microscopic cavities, which are ready to absorb water. And here the magic starts. By pouring the liquid porcelain into plaster mould, the water in the porcelain gets absorbed into plaster and we are left with thin sediment crust. (Yes, this is already your favorite translucent coffee cup with a dragon!) After a few minutes we are left with a few millimetres thickness of porcelain wall. The rest of the liquid is poured away and the casted slip starts to shrink and pops easily out of the mould.

Sounds simple, but we are not done yet! The secrets of kiln and glaze firing are the most intriguing and guarded secrets. Porcelain firing temperatures reach up to 1280C, while the whole process is divided into two steps — the bisque firing (makes the whole object hard and reveals any material impurities like micro-cracks — oh no!) and the final glaze firing, which gives the porcelain body the glass like qualities and creates the sleek look of the porcelain objects.

In such a short introduction to the material, there was already lots of information. But let’s have a look, for a change, at how the old fashion decorative porcelain concept turns into a challenging adventure in contemporary design!

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There’s one more “detail” to porcelain production. While watching a short documentary on Bugatti Veyron L’Or Blanc and the use of unusual porcelain interior decorations, be aware, that porcelain shrinks by 14-16% throughout the whole production. In other words, matching precisely crafted interior car parts with porcelain custom shapes must have been an adventure of its own!